ACTION

 

Tell Federal, State and Local Leaders To Responsibly Prevent Urban Violence

To my Elected Officials, Policymakers and Civic Groups,

According to the Center's For Disease Control, (CDC), Urban violence is preventable. However, a recent large-scale study reveals only a small number of violence prevention programs, when rigorously evaluated, show evidence that their methods reduce violence, (see BluePrints). Still, unproven programs are funded and implemented across America everyday. Outcomes include inconsistent care for families in-need, wasted federal, state and local resources and a lack of proof that the methods used, save lives and prevent injuries.

Recognizing these challenges, this letter confirms my support for responsible prevention measures based in the below:

1 Fund only evidence-based programs, methods and strategies that are scientifically proven to prevent/reduce violence.

2 Apply research, rigorous evaluation/evaluation adherence and monitor integrity within the chosen initiatives.

3 Responsibly investigate innovations in violence prevention and publish results (failure or success). Doing so supports data, while eliminating the need to replicate failing methods.

Urban violence is complex. Therefore, treating warning signs with proven methods, well trained providers and high standards of care ensures more lives, families and resources can be saved.

By my signature, I support the above-mentioned strategies inline with THE SWEETEST LAND. Improvement in prevention and victims services are possible when the appropriate methods are used with integrity.

Sincerely,

[signature]

Share this with your friends:

   

 

tsl_logo3

 

SAVE MORE LIVES

Research suggests only a small number of violence prevention programs, when rigorously evaluated, show evidence that their methods reduce violence, (See BluePrints).  Still, unproven programs are continuously implemented across America at great cost.

Rightfully, the violence prevention industry is tasked to provide complicated and quality care to youth and families most at-risk.  While individual programs want to help,  the widespread use of unproven care can leave families disconnected from what actually works, wastes resources and most importantly, does not prevent deaths and injuries from occurring.   But that is fixable.

According to the Center’s For Disease Control (CDC)“Violence is preventable.”  In fact, when evidence-based strategies are combined with rigorous evaluation and program adherence, the best chances for lifesaving practices/victims care can be in place.

We can build a better safety net.  Treating complicated issues requires trained providers, proven methods and program integrity.

Please read and sign the full petition on the left.

1Rally.mov.Still001

Vigil in Hartford’s North End

Names Provided by Mothers United Against Violence

Homicides in Hartford – 2000-2015 Names Provided by Mothers United Against Violence

Roadside Memorial, Hartford Connecticut

Roadside Memorial, Hartford Connecticut.

 

RESEARCH

BLUEPRINTS

Demand for effective programs to prevent violence and foster healthy youth development continues to grow. Across the country, organizations sponsor a raft of well-intentioned programs. Yet, very few of them have evidence demonstrating their effectiveness, and many are implemented with little consistency or quality control. Unproven programs not only waste scarce resources but also can do harm. Blueprints promotes only those programs with strong scientific evidence of effectiveness.

CDC STRYVE

Striving To Reduce Youth Violence Everywhere (STRYVE) is a national initiative, led by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), which takes a public health approach to preventing youth violence before it starts.

NATIONAL IMPLEMENTATION RESEARCH NETWORK

Evidence-based programs are interesting but not much help unless they can be put into practice and produce the same good results in practice that they produced under laboratory conditions.  The Active Implementation Frameworks summarized in this website synthesize the literature and best practices for HOW to make full and effective use of effective interventions in practice.

Social media & sharing icons powered by UltimatelySocial
Facebook
Facebook
SHARE
YouTube
LinkedIn